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Make a hat fall through the air with controlable turbulence, lift and wind???


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  I'm as experienced as a virgin when it comes to dynamic simulations, but I have been challenged to make a ball cap fall from, roughly 100 feet, then tumble around a bit and land in a predetermined spot. The reference the person used to explain it is "that leaf in Forrest Gump...where ti falls into the pages of that book". I'm tried using multiple instances o turbulence, deflectors and attractors...but it still just a hat with a rigid body tag that falls....more-or-less right through the viewport frame. Can anyone put me on the right path, impart some wisdom or extend a helping hand in the direction of a tutorial that might help me to better grasp the concept?

As always, you are appreciated!!!!

I'm_Not_Gump_Enough.jpg

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7 hours ago, Cerbera said:

You would need to upload your hat model so we can see what you are working with...

 

CBR

 I do sincerely apologize, but there is no physical model/scene as of yet. There is some discussion on whether to use a ball cap or a top hat... but there have been no decisions made as of yet. I suppose any hat would work given that my interest is the dynamics and control of a falling object in general. Any ideas to that end with any object that isn't spherical and maintains some semblance of rigidity should prove to offer reasonable results. That said, I can build a scene, but I don't imagine that it will be the final effort...and to be entirely honest, it wouldn't be much of a scene as I'm quite literally trying to understand the underlying principles in a way that the manual fails to do.

 In that vein, I'm hoping more to better understand how to build the framework for controlling an object "on the wind", so to speak. Does it require a volume to maintain lift? Will it need multiple instances of turbulence to create rotational vectors? Is there a difference between utilizing an attractor over utilizing a set of keyframes to "guide" the hat to a given point? I'm quite literally entirely afloat and looking for land, as it were. As I said, a tutorial suggestion might be a great option too. I purchased Lynda Learning's Cinema 4D tutorials, but they are very, very vague on the means to the end....but I'll defer to your wisdom if you have any suggestions.

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I don't now much about dynamics besides that it's hard to get realistic results.

But your question reminded me of this tweet:

 

E.J. Hassenfratz on Twitter: "How many times have you tried to get a specific animation trying to wrangle #C4D Dynamics when hand keyframing can be faster & gives you the ultimate control for the EXACT animation you want + the ability to exaggerate movements" / Twitter

 

Maybe the best way is to find some good reference and just hand keyframe it?

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15 minutes ago, janheylen said:

I don't now much about dynamics besides that it's hard to get realistic results.

But your question reminded me of this tweet:

 

E.J. Hassenfratz on Twitter: "How many times have you tried to get a specific animation trying to wrangle #C4D Dynamics when hand keyframing can be faster & gives you the ultimate control for the EXACT animation you want + the ability to exaggerate movements" / Twitter

 

Maybe the best way is to find some good reference and just hand keyframe it?

 Much appreciated. ALWAYS option #1, as far as I'm concerned, but the "float" tends to look painfully handmade...much like the difference between stop-motion versus keyframe animation. Besides, I'm spending at least two hours a day in this software package trying to add to my skill level. Being from a motion graphics background, I kind of stumbled into Cinema 4D...but I've learned SO many new tricks with C4D in the the past 4-5 years to do the "same old things" that I was only managing to do poorly in After Effects that I'm always striving to learn something new.

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